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Traditionally, Knox  congregates partipate in the Flowering of Cross each  Easter Sunday morning.  Almost everyone takes some of the fresh daffodils out ot the overflowing vases placed in the Narthex and carefully pokes the stems through the chicken wire laid over the barren wood cross. The congregation continues to decorate the cross until flowers cover it completely.

The flowering of the cross represents the transition from Good Friday to Easter, from meditation on Jesus' death to joyful celebration of his resurrection. The ceremony transforms a barren cross, a reminder of Jesus' death, into an Easter symbol - a lovely image of HOPE.

Covered with fresh, living flowers, the cross serves not only as an emblem of Jesus' resurrection but also of the continuing presence of Christ among us.

Symbolic flowering crosses can be found in Christian art as early as the Sixth Century.

In this new world of physical distancing, we took a different approach  to the flowering of the cross this year by asking people to forward digital images of the daffodils in their yards  or from their photo collections to make a digital version of the traditional Easter transformation.

The gallery of photos in this post is just a small selection of what was shared.  We used 150 photos (all that were submitted) to flower our 2020 digital crosss. Thanks very much to everyone who contributed.